Habitat Bulgaria’s Statement

News

WITH REGARDS TO: The Draft of the Long-term Strategy for Renovation of the National Housing and Non-housing Stock 2021-2050, published for public consultations.

The Draft of the Long-term Strategy for Renovation of the National Housing and Non-housing Stock 2021-2050 has been published on the site for public consultations of the Bulgarian Council of Ministers. The set goal is the renovation of 60 percent of the housing stock in Bulgaria as well of approximately 17 percent of the non-housing stock. This will bring to saving 7,329 GWh of energy per annum.

Habitat Bulgaria put forward a Statement of comments and proposals to the draft strategy focused mainly on the requirements and the access to the energy renovations measures of low-income families.

Attachment: СТАНОВИЩЕ на Фондация „Подслон за човечеството“


SIGN THE PETITION AND CHANGE THE COUNT! Push the EU to solve the global housing crisis. #home4all

News

By 2030, 1 out of 4 people will live in poor housing conditions.

The fast-moving challenge posed by the COVID-19 pandemic adds another urgent reason to ensure that people can shelter at home and protect their health and families.

ACT NOW Sign the petition:

https://bit.ly/home4all_петиция

In Europe today, young people cannot afford to rent a flat in many cities; and a growing number of families cannot pay their heating and cooling bills. Globally, more than half of the urban population lives in slums. Proper housing is a matter of life and death in the current pandemic as people are asked to stay at home to protect themselves against the coronavirus.

Home has become more important than ever, and the European Union has a role to play.
Join Habitat for Humanity in calling on the EU to:

● Prioritize affordable housing in the next EU budget for 2021-27, particularly for countries in the global South;
● Increase funding for access to water and sanitation and for slum upgrading to protect communities against diseases;
● Address energy poverty in the European Green Deal with concrete financial measures.

Situation

More than half of the people around the world live in urban areas. By 2050, urban residents are expected to almost double, adding an additional 2,5 billion people to the global urban population. Cities will continue to grow as people search for jobs, stability and the promise of a better life. While progress has been made, the world’s ability to meet the housing demand of the global urban population is currently outpaced by the rate of urbanisation. One in every 8 people live in a slum.

Without adequate and affordable housing; without land rights, more and more families are at risk of poverty and insecurity. The current coronavirus pandemic has highlighted importance of housing as the means of protection against deadly diseases. A proper home has become the most important remedy. But it is not accessible to all. Habitat for Humanity works for access to decent housing because it is foundational to individuals and families, to the to the communities in which we live and to the economies in which we all participate.

However, many countries are unprepared and unable to meet the growing housing needs of urban residents. The expected global population increase of 1,18 billion combined with the existing global housing need, means that approximately 2 billion people will be in need of adequate housing in 2030. This creates an unprecedented housing challenge.

Why should we sign this now?

The European Union—the world’s biggest development donor —has a unique opportunity and responsibility to help partner countries in the global South to scale up efforts to meet housing needs. The next EU budget for 2021-27 is a key tool to help millions of people to improve their housing conditions and help them fight the coronavirus pandemic.

The European Commission launched the European Green Deal to address the climate emergency. At the heart of this initiative lies a “renovation wave” of existing buildings, and a focus on alleviating energy poverty to ensure a Just Transition towards a green economy.

Take action now. Join Habitat for Humanity and partner organizations all over Europe to urge the EU to support the above recommendations, promoting a world in which everyone has a decent place to live.

Partner organizations:

Habitat for Humanity International EMEA
Habitat for Humanity Bulgaria


Habitat Bulgaria starts a new partnership with the European Climate Foundation

News

The European Climate Foundation will support Habitat Bulgaria’s advocacy work in the areas of the residential energy efficiency and the development of a definition for “Energy Poverty”.

Habitat Bulgaria will actively advocate for the adoption of a Long-term Strategy for the Renovation of the Housing and Non-housing Stock 2021-2050, the development of a definition, parameters and content of “Energy Poverty” and the prolongation of the National Programme for Energy Efficiency of the Multi-family Buildings on the basis of new principles for co-financing and selection and with a focus on supporting the low-income households for their participation in the Programme.

The partnership between the European Climate Foundation and Habitat Bulgaria starts on July 1st, 2020 and is contracted for one year.


Project: “Research Based Arguments for New Housing Policies in Benefit of All”

News

Habitat Bulgaria is implementing the project “Research Based Arguments for New Housing Policies in Benefit of All”. The project started in October 2019 and is funded within the first call for strategic projects of Active Citizen Fund Bulgaria with the Financial Mechanism of the European Economic Area.

The duration of the project, which aims to support the development of adequate municipal and national housing policies and to contribute to the improvement of the housing conditions of vulnerable groups of the population, is 24 months. The project ends in September 2021.

Within the scope of the new project initiative, Habitat Bulgaria will carry out a detailed sociological research of the housing needs in the Roma communities in the town of Sliven – the district of “Nadezhda” and the village of Topolchane as well in the town of Targovishte – “Malcho Malchev” district and the village of Golyamo Novo. In parallel, Habitat Bulgaria will assess the current housing policies of the municipalities and will prepare an analytical report and recommendations. A debate and direct interventions with the public authorities and other local stakeholders will be initiated on the basis of the report to articulate municipal housing policies, programs and decrees, relevant to the real needs.

The vision, as well the goals and the measures needed for the improvement of the housing conditions, will be discussed at round table discussions with the interested stakeholders. Several local organizations will be trained to advocate for housing and housing-related issues with the local governments. The analytical report and the recommendations will be presented at a National Housing Forum to be attended by the local and the national institutions.

The project “Research Based Arguments for New Housing Policies in Benefit of All” is implemented with a financial support of 93,000 Euro, secured by Iceland, Lichtenstein and Norway within the Financial Mechanism of the European Economic Area. The main goal of the project is to contribute to the development of long-term, needs-driven municipal and national housing policies, which will secure safe and adequate housing for Roma.


Statement of Habitat Bulgaria

News

Statement of Habitat Bulgaria on the Voluntary National Review of the progress of Bulgaria in the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals of the UN.

In February 2020, the Bulgarian Ministry of the Foreign Affairs submitted to the Council of Ministers the Voluntary National Review of Bulgaria of the progress in the implementation of each of the 17 SDGs of the UN. The review was published on the portal for public consultations of the Cabinet on February 20, 2020.

Habitat Bulgaria developed a position on the VNR and published it on the portal on March 5, 2020.

HFH Bulgaria’s position includes a general comment that for each of the 17 SDGs, there are specific objectives, which specify what, how much and until when, the countries, incl. Bulgaria, have committed to achieve. In view of this, HFH Bulgaria recommends that the review of the progress should exhibit the progress concerning the specific objectives and their indicators as adopted by the UN. Additional arguments are to be found in the guidelines for the assessment of the progress in the implementation of the SDGs, which recommend that:

• The conclusions have to be based on empirical evidence allowing tangible measurement;
• Particular steps, which the countries intend to make in the near future and the years to follow, in order to speed up the progress, shall be identified.

HFH Bulgaria also elaborates on SDG 1, SDG 7 and SDG 11and some of their specific objectives to adduce several critical comments about the following:

The review does not show what the values of the indicators were by September 2015 and what they are now, i.e. are there homeless people, inadequate housing, informal housing, access to basic infrastructure and utilities, ghettos and the share of the population living in ghettos and is there any progress and what actions have been planned.

HFH Bulgaria reminds that the National Housing Strategy drafted in 2017 – 2018 has not been adopted and the country has no long-term housing policies, which would guarantee the improvement of the housing conditions by 2030.

HFH Bulgaria indicates that a statement included in the review that “The economically deprived regions and vulnerable groups of the population are given a priority in the renovation of the housing stock…” contradicts with the practice in the funding of housing renovation projects by the National Program for EE of the Multifamily buildings.

In conclusion, HFH Bulgaria recommends a revision of the document in a way, which objectively shows the progress of the country in the implementation of the goals based on the approved indicators.

05 March 2020,
Sofia

Mincho Benov
National Director, Habitat Bulgaria

Read more: СТАНОВИЩЕ на Фондация „Подслон за човечеството“ / Habitat for Humanity Bulgaria


The largest global advocacy campaign to improve access to land for shelter has reached another ten municipalities in Bulgaria

News

Within the three-year campaign (2018 – 2020), Habitat Bulgaria continues its successful series of meetings and volunteer actions with municipalities and universities, focusing on the challenges and opportunities of urbanization, as well as improving of the urban environment.

During the workshops, the options for renovation of the poor neighbourhoods were discussed – namely, improving living conditions and providing access to basic sanitation. Currently, one in every seven people on the planet lives in unduly built and overcrowded urban areas, with insufficient infrastructure, often without access to electricity and water.

There was also discussion about the need to improve land rights. Globally, 75% of people do not have adequate documentation of the land on which they live, and millions live in constant fear of eviction. At the same time, they do not want to leave their homes, where they have sometimes lived their entire lives. Habitat for Humanity experts are adamant that with secured property or right to use, people will live without fear of eviction and invest more in their families, communities and the future.

In 2018 and 2019, in the campaign took part the municipalities of Smyadovo, Targovishte, Antonovo, Gabrovo, Kyustendil, Dupnitsa, Nessebar, Burgas, Sungurlare, Sofia – Nadezhda district, Simitli, Pavlikeni, Lyaskovets, Gorna Oryahovitsa, Botevgrad, Samokov , Mezdra, Stara Zagora, Lom and Pravets, as well as the universities – University of Architecture, Civil Engineering and Geodesy (UACEG), New Bulgarian University (NBU), Sofia University “St. Kliment Ohridski” (Sofia University) and the University of Forestry (LTU). Over 2000 participants, including representatives of the municipal administration, youth and non-governmental organizations, citizens and the media, actively participated in the initiatives.

Through the activities conducted, Habitat Bulgaria aims to show that the path to sustainable cities and a decent life for everyone goes not only through state and municipal policies, but also through our personal responsibility and our actions as citizens and neighbours.

For context
Countries around the world are increasingly driven by the desire to revive the global commitment to sustainable urbanization:
UN Sustainable Development Goals adopted in New York in September 2015 include SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities.
The New Urban Agenda was adopted in October 2016 in Quito, Ecuador, at the United Nations Third Global Conference on Housing Policies and Sustainable Urban Development Habitat III.
The Urban Agenda for the EU was adopted during the Dutch EU Presidency on 30 May 2016 with the Amsterdam Pact.

About Solid Ground:
Habitat for Humanity launched Solid Ground, a global advocacy campaign to improve access to land for shelter. The four-year campaign, which committed to influencing land policies and systems, resulted in more than 3 million people with increased access to safe and secure land in over 40 countries around the world.
http://buildsolidground.bg
https://habitat.org/emea/impact/our-campaigns/build-solid-ground
http://solidgroundcampaign.org


III National Housing Forum “Access to Housing and Renovation of Poor Neighborhoods”

News

With two National Housing Forums held in 2013 and 2016, Habitat Bulgaria has sharpened the attention of institutions and the public on the need to improve housing conditions in the country. This year, the organization is focusing on the growing need to secure access to housing and renovate poor neighborhoods by organizing the third National Housing Forum with the focus on access to housing and renovation of the poor neighborhoods. The forum is implemented within the Build Solid Ground project, approved and funded by the Development Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development (DG DEVCO) under the Development Education and Awareness Raising (DEAR) strand. Partners of the event are the French Institute in Bulgaria and the Wienerberger Group.

Countries in the world are increasingly driven by the desire to revive a global commitment to sustainable urbanization. In September 2015, at the New York Summit on Sustainable Development, the United Nations adopted a new development agenda called: “Transforming the World: Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development”. The document identified 17 global sustainable development goals and in particular, Goal 11: Sustainable cities and communities. The first of its 10 specific objectives is to: “Ensure that everyone has access to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic services by 2030, and that ghettos and poor neighborhoods are renovated.”

In October 2016, more than 167 countries welcomed the New Urban Agenda in Quito, Ecuador, during the United Nations Third Global Conference on Housing Policies and Sustainable Urban Development Habitat III. During the Dutch EU Presidency, on 30 May 2016, the Amsterdam Pact was adopted, which established the Urban Agenda for the EU.

These important global developments have identified the main highlights of the Forum agenda:

Panel I. Agenda 2030, Global Sustainable Development Goal 11 and Access to Housing for All and Poverty Refurbishment by 2030. The global framework outlined by the Sustainable Development Goals. UN, Habitat III – The New Urban Agenda, Urban Agenda for Europe.
Panel II. Bulgaria and Agenda 2030 on access to housing and renovation of poor neighborhoods. The position of the institutions committed to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals in terms of access to housing and renovation of poor neighborhoods.
Panel IІI. Non-governmental sector initiatives to improve housing conditions and partner with municipalities for housing policies.
Panel IV. Good practices of Bulgarian municipalities for improving the living conditions in poor neighborhoods. The challenges that Bulgarian municipalities face for renovating poor neighborhoods and the approaches they apply to securing the right of access to housing.
The full program of the event can be viewed in Bulgarian HERE.

The participants of the forum, including over 80 top-level local experts, discussed that Bulgaria, as a party to a number of international agreements, has committed itself to achieving the set goals, but at present the level of implementation is unsatisfactory. The right of access to housing is not explicitly enshrined in Bulgarian law. For decades, no solution has been found for illegal constructions, which are the sole home of their inhabitants. The municipalities do not have the housing and financial resources to provide alternative accommodation for the needy. Poor neighborhoods are often unregulated and lacking the necessary infrastructure.

“The draft National Housing Strategy, which was published for public consultation, did not address the real problems of the so-called segregated areas. I hope in the improved version of the document we will find the answer to the question of how we will solve the housing problems of the people who live in these areas and how to overcome poverty”, emphasizes Daniela Ushatova, Team Leader “Municipal Services and Finance”, National Association of Municipalities in the Republic of Bulgaria.

Those in attendance agreed that the adoption of a long-term and pragmatic national housing policy, supported by targeted funding, is needed to address these issues. The Ministry of Regional Development and Public Works (MRDPW) is in the process of developing and discussing a new National Housing Strategy, which should show the political will to secure the right of access to housing and renovation of poor neighborhoods.

For context
Countries around the world are increasingly driven by the desire to revive the global commitment to sustainable urbanization:
UN Sustainable Development Goals adopted in New York in September 2015 include SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities.
The New Urban Agenda was adopted in October 2016 in Quito, Ecuador, at the United Nations Third Global Conference on Housing Policies and Sustainable Urban Development Habitat III.
The Urban Agenda for the EU was adopted during the Dutch EU Presidency on 30 May 2016 with the Amsterdam Pact.

About Solid Ground:
Habitat for Humanity launched Solid Ground, a global advocacy campaign to improve access to land for shelter. The four-year campaign, which committed to influencing land policies and systems, resulted in more than 3 million people with increased access to safe and secure land in over 40 countries around the world.
http://buildsolidground.bg
https://habitat.org/emea/impact/our-campaigns/build-solid-ground
http://solidgroundcampaign.org


The largest global advocacy campaign to improve access to land for shelter is launching in Bulgaria

News

Cities cannot respond to the need for housing. People move there in large numbers to find work, but the population growth rate exceeds the rate of adequate housing. By 2030, three out of every five people in the world are expected to live in cities, and the ghetto population will double, reaching 2 billion.

These issues are the focus of Build Solid Ground, the new global housing and housing rights campaign of Habitat for Humanity International. The advocacy campaign, which goes under the motto that everyone deserves to have a decent home and feel protected from threats to their property, is already working in over 30 countries around the world.
Within Build Solid Ground, Habitat Bulgaria launches a series of meetings in Bulgarian municipalities and universities on the challenges and opportunities of urbanization.

Currently, one in every seven people on the planet lives in unduly built and overcrowded urban areas, with insufficient infrastructure, often without access to electricity, water and sewer.

In 2018-2020, Habitat Bulgaria will visit thirty municipalities across the country. The municipalities planned for 2018 are Smyadovo, Targovishte, Antonovo, Gabrovo, Pavlikeni, Nessebar, Burgas, Dupnitsa, Kyustendil and Sofia. During the meetings in the municipalities, the options for renovation of the poor neighborhoods will be considered – namely, improving living conditions and providing access to basic sanitation.

The need to improve land rights will also be discussed. Globally, 75% of people in the world do not have adequate documentation of the land on which they live and millions live in constant fear of eviction, unwilling to leave their homes where they have sometimes lived for a lifetime. Habitat for Humanity experts are adamant that with secured property or use rights, people live without fear of eviction and invest more in their families, communities and the future.
At the same time, the university meetings will seek to provoke students’ interest in urbanization, as well as to explore their proposals for innovative solutions to problems, the focus of the campaign.

“Urbanization poses a huge challenge to sustainability in terms of housing, but if it is well planned, it can serve as a powerful tool for sustainable global development”, says Mincho Benov – National Director of Habitat Bulgaria.

For context
Countries around the world are increasingly driven by the desire to revive the global commitment to sustainable urbanization:
UN Sustainable Development Goals adopted in New York in September 2015 include SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities.
The New Urban Agenda was adopted in October 2016 in Quito, Ecuador, at the United Nations Third Global Conference on Housing Policies and Sustainable Urban Development Habitat III.
The Urban Agenda for the EU was adopted during the Dutch EU Presidency on 30 May 2016 with the Amsterdam Pact.

About Solid Ground:
Habitat for Humanity launched Solid Ground, a global advocacy campaign to improve access to land for shelter. The four-year campaign, which committed to influencing land policies and systems, resulted in more than 3 million people with increased access to safe and secure land in over 40 countries around the world.
http://buildsolidground.bg
https://habitat.org/emea/impact/our-campaigns/build-solid-ground
http://solidgroundcampaign.org


By 2030, 1 out of 4 people will live in poor housing conditions

News

Sofia, 28 – 29 May 2018
People move to large cities to find work, with population growth exceeding the rate at which cities can respond to the need for housing. Currently, one in every seven people on the planet lives in unduly built and overcrowded urban areas, with insufficient infrastructure, often without access to electricity, water and sewage. By 2030, the population in the world’s poorest neighbourhoods is expected to double, reaching 2 billion people.

These were part of the findings during the first day of the International Conference “Sustainable Cities: New Challenges and Opportunities for Municipalities”, organized by the Bulgarian national organization of the global organization Habitat for Humanity International and held under the patronage of the President of the Republic of Bulgaria.

Welcome address by the President of the Republic of Bulgaria – Mr. Rumen Radev: “Meetings like today look for the right solutions. They show that local authorities are not alone. Representatives from different institutions, academia, professional and civil communities, from different parts of the world, are involved in their efforts.”

The conference, which continues tomorrow, looks at the sustainable development of modern cities in the context of growing urbanization, climate change and housing problems in contemporary urban areas and the actions of municipalities to address them. The forum is part of Build Solid Ground, Habitat for Humanity’s global advocacy campaign for access to housing and housing rights, operating in more than 30 countries around the world. http://solidgroundcampaign.org

The conference participants, including over 120 local and international top-level experts, agreed on the thesis that every person deserves to have a decent home and feel protected from threats to their property. Attendees discussed that urbanization poses a huge challenge to housing sustainability, but that if well planned, it can serve as a powerful tool for sustainable global development. The solution, supported by the experts in attendance, was the renovation of poor neighborhoods – namely, the need to improve living conditions in informal settlements around the world, to provide access to basic sanitation, and to decent housing in the long term.

Experts also commented on the need to improve land rights worldwide – a significant problem in the context of urbanization is that 75% of people in the world do not have adequate documentation of the land they live in and millions live in constant fear of eviction, unwilling to leave the homes they used to live in for a lifetime. It was shared that with secured property or right of use, people live without fear of eviction and invest more in their families, communities and the future. “By 2030, three out of every five people will live in cities. Urbanization is one of the most transformative trends of the century and can be a source of both challenges and solutions,” said Mincho Benov – National Director of Habitat Bulgaria.

Climate change and the need to improve housing energy efficiency were discussed during the first day of the conference, including through the implementation of energy poverty reduction practices at the municipal level, as well as those contributing to climate change mitigation. The conference continues on May 29 at the Hilton Hotel in Sofia and is open to media representatives. Some of the topics that will be discussed during the second day include innovative approaches to territorial planning; as well as funding opportunities for urban challenges and urban innovation. (Program of the event)

About the Conference
The International Conference “Sustainable Cities: New Challenges and Opportunities for Municipalities” is under the auspices of the President of the Republic of Bulgaria and is supported by the Embassy of the Netherlands in Bulgaria, the National Association of Municipalities in the Republic of Bulgaria, Municipal Energy Efficiency Network EcoEnergy, National Coalition Decent Home, institutions, municipalities and NGOs. The Forum is implemented within the framework of the “Build Solid Ground” project, approved and funded by the Development Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development (DG DEVCO) under the Development Education and Awareness Raising (DEAR) strand.

For context
Countries around the world are increasingly driven by the desire to revive the global commitment to sustainable urbanization:
UN Sustainable Development Goals adopted in New York in September 2015 include SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities.
The New Urban Agenda was adopted in October 2016 in Quito, Ecuador, at the United Nations Third Global Conference on Housing Policies and Sustainable Urban Development Habitat III.
The Urban Agenda for the EU was adopted during the Dutch EU Presidency on 30 May 2016 with the Amsterdam Pact.

About Solid Ground:
Habitat for Humanity launched Solid Ground, a global advocacy campaign to improve access to land for shelter. The four-year campaign, which committed to influencing land policies and systems, resulted in more than 3 million people with increased access to safe and secure land in over 40 countries around the world.
http://buildsolidground.bg
https://habitat.org/emea/impact/our-campaigns/build-solid-ground
http://solidgroundcampaign.org


Habitat Bulgaria has come up with a package of proposals to the government

News

Hundreds of thousands of people in Bulgaria today live in conditions far below the minimum standards for housing. Nearly 395,000 people live with three or more other people in a room, in difficult conditions, often in poorly constructed, hand-built houses. Poor housing conditions lead to social and economic isolation of residents. The state and municipalities must devote resources to addressing these problems, and there is an urgent need to take a package of measures to guarantee the right to a decent life for these people.

These are part of the findings of Habitat Bulgaria, a participant in Habitat for Humanity ‘s global Solid Ground, advocacy campaign, on access to housing and housing rights. As part of the campaign, the organization today came up with a proposal for a package of government measures aimed at improving housing conditions in the country, in line with the UN’s New Agenda entitled Transforming Our World: Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development, adopted by 193 countries, incl. and Bulgaria on September 25, 2015, at the UN General Assembly.

The Solid Ground project is in line with the eleventh Global Sustainable Development Goal – SDG 11 “Transforming Cities and Towns into Inclusive, Safe, Stable and Sustainable Centers”, and in particular the first of its 10 specific goals: “By 2030, to ensure that everyone has access to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic services and renovation of poor neighborhoods.”

The Bulgarian office of the global organization Habitat for Humanity has announced measures to improve the country’s living conditions in accordance with the new UN Global Sustainable Development Goals:

In the State Budget Act:

Tens of thousands of people in Bulgaria live in extremely poor technical and hygienic homes, without running water and sanitary facilities, with poor street network and infrastructure. Poor housing conditions cause serious problems for people in other areas of life, such as education, employment and healthcare. There are hundreds of thousands of people in need of social housing in Bulgaria. At the same time, the implementation of the housing improvement measures in the Action Plan of the National Strategy of the Republic of Bulgaria for Roma Integration (2012-2020) is not tied to financial resources, except for the funds provided under Operational Program “Regions for Growth” 2014-2020 to build only about 500 social housing units across the country.

Habitat Bulgaria proposes in the State Budget Law of the Republic of Bulgaria for 2018 to earmark funds for the implementation of different packages of measures from the Action Plan to the National Strategy of the Republic of Bulgaria for Roma Integration, priority Housing Conditions.

In the Municipal Property Act:

Access to social housing is not regulated by Bulgarian law and there are no responsibilities assigned to the state or municipalities. The latter have neither the legal obligation nor the resources to respond to the need for social housing. The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, the right to social assistance and housing assistance, designed to ensure the decent living of all in need, is recognized and respected.

Habitat Bulgaria proposes to introduce in the Municipal Property Act two categories: “acute/ urgent housing need”, as well as “social housing” to enable the right of access to housing at the local level.

In the Rules for Implementation of the Social Assistance Act:

Very often, families in need of housing cannot overcome the bureaucratic barriers and many are not registered at all in the municipal filings. On the other hand, the process of legal housing construction is too complex and time-consuming, even for homes up to 50 square meters.

Habitat Bulgaria proposes that in the Rules for Implementation of the Law on Social Assistance, social services should be supplemented with a new service – housing mediator/ assistant. The role of the housing mediator is to advise and support families in the process of issuing a certificate for tolerable construction; design, approval and construction of legal housing; applying for accommodation in municipal housing; improving the safety of homes or addressing other ongoing environmental problems.

“In order to achieve the European Union’s 2020 policy goals – Economic Stability, Combating Climate Change and Social Inclusion, as well as the objectives of the Republic of Bulgaria set out in the National Development Program” Bulgaria 2020, housing should be a priority”, said Mincho Benov, National Director of Habitat Bulgaria.

In order to promote the Solid Ground campaign locally and gain additional support, Habitat Bulgaria invited three contemporary Bulgarian artists to “translate” into the language of art the idea of ​​adequate housing as a basic human right. The campaign is partnered with the global social media platform Fine Acts.

About Solid Ground:
Habitat for Humanity launched Solid Ground, a global advocacy campaign to improve access to land for shelter. The four-year campaign, which committed to influencing land policies and systems, resulted in more than 3 million people with increased access to safe and secure land in over 40 countries around the world.
http://solidgroundcampaign.org